Monday, April 16, 2007

It's Official !

It is now officially spring. While paddling near the South Shore Launch Club yesterday, I had my first North American Yachty (NAY) sighting. This species, native to this area, is a most interesting breed.

Much like the Dung Beetle or the tropics, the Nay's gather crap and store it in large fiberglass structures for a purpose science is yet to discover. They do this all summer and into fall while the structures are floated and tied to piers around the club house. The structures seldom go anywhere as the NAY's spend much of the season cleaning and polishing their little dung structures. Then, come late fall, the structures are suddenly found on shore again and the NAY's no where to be found until they reappear in spring to repeat this ancient ritual. It is also interesting to note that the dung poiles are often found in blue cacoons.

Once an official spotting of even on NAY is reported (as I am doing here...but I digress), summer soon occurs; and this has been true 100% since these sightings have been recorded (this being the first year). This is one instance where I truly welcome the NAY-Sayers.

Paddle safe...

DS

5 comments:

Alex said...

Hey Dick,

I've been fighting a cold for the past couple weeks which really limited my kayaking to a couple pool sessions. No kayaking = no kayaking blog posts for me. However, I finally got out on some whitewater this past weekend so I should get a post up in the near future.

Kristen said...

Nice one, Silbs. I enjoyed that.

DaveO said...

A couple of years back we were paddling in the Apostles on the 4th of July weekend in beautiful breezy weather. Around noon there were several NAYS out on the water with their plumage prominently displayed. By 4pm they had all disappeared to various sheltered gathering points and reeled in their plumage. Do you think they were gathering nectar? Please advise

Capt'n "O" Dark 30 said...

Woo hoo! Somebody toss that dude a life-ring...

musing myself...

Silbs said...

Thanks Kristen...and Daveo: This rapid shedding and repleneshing of plummage is believed to be a mating ritual. Research continues.